Vitarade® fueled by Vitargo®

Researches

Research 1

Piehl Aulin K., Soderlund K.. et. al.: Improved gastric emptying rate in humans of a unique glucose polymer with gel-forming properties (Vitargo). Scene J. Gastroenterol 2000, 35: 1143-1149.

http://informahealthcare.com/doi/abs/10.1080/003655200750056600

The purpose of test:

Comparison of the rate of gastric emptying of two carbohydrate drinks with different osmolality and viscosity and the same amount of carbohydrates therefore delivering the same amount of energy.

Test method:

Six healthy male subjects were studied twice. Each of them consumed 550 ml of carbohydrate drink containing 13.5% of carbohydrate either in the form of glucose and short chain glucose oligomers (drink G) or of long chain glucose polymers composed of 78% amylopectin and 22% amylose (drink C – Vitargo®). Osmolality of drink G was 336 mosmol/kg while drink C - 62 mosmol/kg.

Test results:

The half emptying time (the time needed for a half of consumed carbohydrates to leave stomach) was 17,0 minutes (6,2-31,4 min) for drink C and 32,6 minutes (25,2-40,7 min) for drink G, so drink C left the stomach at much higher rate.

It was also shown that the amount of carbohydrate delivered to the small intestine during the first 10 min after ingestion was greater for drink C 31.8 (15.8-55.9 g) than after ingestion of drink G -14.3 (6.8-22.2g).

Moreover, although drink C was much faster than drink G in gastric emptying and carbohydrate delivering, it didn’t cause raise in the blood glucose or serum.

Test conclusions:

Drink C containing amylopectin and amylase (Vitargo®), despite the propensity to form a gel, leaves the stomach faster than solution of glucose and its oligomers (regular carbohydrate drinks) without raising blood glucose and serum insulin levels.

Research 2

Piehl Aulin K., Soderlund K.., Hultman E.: Muscle glycogen resynthesis rate in humans after supplementation of drinks containing carbohydrates with low and high molecular masses (Vitargo). Eur. J. Appl. Physiol. 2000, 81: 346-351

http://www.springerlink.com/content/bxe1gbrlca6x5lfg/

The purpose of test:

Comparison of the rate of glycogen resynthesis after consuming carbohydrate drinks with different osmolality and similar amount of carbohydrates of different molecular mass.

Test method:

Thirteen healthy, well-trained men have taken part in tests twice. Each time were divided into two groups (C and G). Each man performed a glycogen depleting exercises and consumed either a carbohydrate drink containing glucose and its oligomers (G drink – regular carbohydrate drink) or a carbohydrate drink containing high molecular mass glucose polymers (drink C – Vitargo®). During the two hours after the workout each of participants consumed 300 grams of carbohydrates (4,2g / kilogram of body weight) divided into 4 portions of 500 ml fluid containing 75 grams of carbohydrates. First portion was consumed immediately after the workout and next ones 30, 60 and 90 minutes later. To estimate influence of consumed carbohydrates on muscle glycogen levels, muscle biopsies were obtained at the end of exercise and after 2 and 4h of recovery.

Test results:

Immediately after the workout muscle glycogen was 52,9±27,4 mmol glycosyl units/kg of dry mass in the C group and 58.3±35.4 mmol glycosyl units/kg of dry mass in the G group.

During first 2 hours after exercise, glycogen resynthesis rate was remarkably (70%) higher in C group (50,2±13,7 mmol/kg of lean body mass) comparing to 29,9±12,5 mmol/kg of lean body mass in group G.

After another two hours glycogen resynthesis rate was similar in both groups: 18,8±33,3 mmol/kg of lean body mass after consuming drink C and 23,2±22,4 mmol/kg of lean body mass after consuming drink G. Moreover, despite the higher rate of glycogen resynthesis (when compared to drink G), drink C didn’t cause raise in blood glucose and serum insulin.

Conclusions:

Drink C, containing high molecular mass and low osmolality (Vitargo®) was shown to be more efficient than drink G (regular carbohydrate drink) increasing muscle glycogen rate after the intensive workout, with no influence on level of glucose and insulin in blood.

Research 3

Stephens F.B., Roig M., Armstrong G., Greenhaff P.L.: Post-exercise ingestion of unique, high molecular weight glucose polymer solution improves performance during a subsequent bout of cycling exercise. J. Sport Sci, 2007; 1-6.

http://www.tandfonline.com/doi/abs/10.1080/02640410701361548

The aim:

To determine the effect of high molecular mass carbohydrates on the amount of work performed during subsequent bouts of intense exercise.

The study:

Eight healthy men took part in the experiment, each of them took three randomized bouts (the participants didn’t know which drink they are consuming) with a 1 week break between the bouts. They cycled to exhaustion at 73.0% of maximal oxygen uptake (VO2max). Immediately after the bout, participants consumed a one-liter solution containing sugar-free flavored water (control), 100 g of a low molecular weight glucose polymer (900 g·mmol-1) or 100 g of a very high molecular weight glucose polymer (500000-700000 g·mmol-1 – Vitargo®) and rested on a bed for 2 h. Each time after recovery all participants performed 15-min time-trial on a cycle ergometer during which maximal work output was determined.

Results:

Post-exercise ingestion of the very high molecular weight glucose polymer solution caused (30 minutes after ingestion) slightly higher increase of glucose (8,1 mmol·l-1) and insulin (80,6 mU·l-1) serum levels in comparison to low molecular mass glucose polymers (7.3 mmol·l-1 i 68,7 mU·l-1 respectively) and higher in comparison to flavored water (3,9 mmol·l-1 i 6,0 mU·l-1 respectively). Moreover, consuming high molecular mass carbohydrates resulted in average 10% increase in maximal work output (164,1 kJ) in comparison to low molecular mass glucose polymers (149,4 kJ) and 20% higher in comparison to flavored water (137,5 kJ). The increased maximal work output (in comparison to other drinks) was observed in all participants ranging from 3,4 to 23,3%.

Conclusions:

High molecular mass carbohydrate solution (Vitargo®) replenishes muscle glycogen stores quickly by rapid increase of glucose and insulin serum levels. Moreover, the consumption of high molecular mass carbohydrates (Vitargo®) allows to generate higher work output during subsequent exercise bouts. The consumption of high molecular mass carbohydrates (Vitargo®) can be convenient solution for everyone who wants to increase their body effort capacity.

TRIPLECARB FORMULA

TRIPLECARB FORMULA is based on the most up-to-date clinical trials results. Unique blend of three different kinds of carbohydrates contained in TRIPLECARB FORMULA guarantees optimal body support during physical effort. TRIPLECARB FORMULA is a blend of high molecular mass carbohydrates (Vitargo®), medium chain glucose polymers and fructose in proper ratio, to ensure very fast and steady carbohydrate release into the bloodstream.

Clinical trials results show that high molecular mass glucose polymers (Vitargo®) have much higher gastric emptying rate1 and they replenish muscle glycogen faster2 in comparison to regular carbohydrate products containing maltodextrines and glucose. Moreover, it has been shown that solutions containing medium chain glucose polymers and fructose also have higher gastric emptying rate, in comparison to glucose solutions3. TRIPLECARB FORMULA contains three different kinds of carbohydrates with various gastric emptying rate. First, very quick source of energy is glucose released from high molecular mass glucose polymers (Vitargo®). The steady supply of carbohydrates is sustained by glucose from medium chain polymers. The addition of fructose increases gastric emptying rate and body hydration even more4, prolongs the period of time in which the carbohydrates form TRIPLECARB FORMULA are used, as well as increases the total amount of consumed carbohydrates5-10.

Unique properties of TRIPLECARB FORMULA result from different mechanism of intestinal absorption of fructose and glucose from high molecular mass (Vitargo®) and medium chain polymers. Absorption of glucose is based on transport by SGLT-1 (Sodium Dependent Glucose Transporter-1) while fructose is transported by GLUT5, which is sodium independent11. Therefore glucose transport is dependent on sodium presence in intestines, while fructose doesn’t need it. When too much of glucose polymers or glucose is consumed, SGLT-1 transporter becomes saturated hence the carbohydrates absorption becomes inhibited, because there is no other way to absorb the rest of glucose. In such situation carbohydrates remaining in stomach can lead to pain and GI (gastrointestinal) distress. It’s important to remember that intensive physical activity decreases blood circulation in the intestines, which slows down the motility and nutrients absorption rate. Addition of fructose increases the gastric emptying rate of carbohydrate solutions3 and "dual channel" transport of carbohydrates from intestines protects from saturation of SGLT-1 glucose transporters. TRIPLECARB FORMULA doesn’t stress gastrointestinal tract during intensive physical effort, so it can be consumed by people with very sensitive stomach.

Moreover, clinical trials have shown that separate ways of TRIPLECARB FORMULA carbohydrates intestine absorption increase their usage (oxidation) during intensive physical effort in comparison to glucose and its polymers alone7-10. Researches show even 40-50% increase of usage (oxidation) of carbohydrates from blends of fructose and glucose and its polymers in comparison to glucose and its polymers alone7-10. It has been also shown that carbohydrate blends like TRIPLECARB FORMULA containing different kinds of carbohydrates can improve performance by 8 – 19% compared to glucose solutions or plain water5,11. Efficiency of TRIPLECARB FORMULA results from the unique properties of its carbohydrates that allow to save natural body energy stores because body can use “external” source of carbohydrates provided with gel or drink. Spared liver and muscle glycogen can be used to maintain the high intensity of performed exercise for longer period of time. TRIPLECARB FORMULA increases body performance during intensive exercise, allowing to achieve better results during competitions, games or intensive workouts.

References:

  1. Piehl Aulin K., Soderlund K. et. al.: Improved gastric emptying rate in humans of a unique glucose polymer with gel-forming properties (Vitargo). Scene J. Gastroenterol 2000, 35: 1143-1149.
  2. Piehl Aulin K., Soderlund K., Hultman E.: Muscle glycogen resynthesis rate in humans after supplementation of drinks containing carbohydrates with low and high molecular masses (Vitargo). Eur. J. Appl. Physiol. 2000, 81: 346-351
  3. Sole C.C., Noakes T.D.: Faster gastric emptying for glucose-polymer and fructose solutions than to glucose in humans. Eur. J. Appl. Physiol. 1989, 58; 605-612.
  4. Jeukendrup AE, Moseley L.: Multiple Transportable Carbohydrates Enhance Gastric Emptying and Fluid Delivery. Scand J Med Sci Sports 2008, 20; 112-121.
  5. Currell K, Jeukendrup A.: Superior Endurance Performance with Ingestion of Multiple Transportable Carbohydrates. Med Sci Sports Exerc 2008; 40: 275–281.
  6. Jeukendrup A.E.: Carbohydrate and exercise performance: the role of multiple transportable carbohydrates. Curr Opin Clin Nutr Metab Care 2010, 13; 452–457.
  7. Jentiens R.L.P.G., Moseley L., Waring R.H., Harding L.K., Jeukendrup A.: Oxidation of combined ingestion of glucose and fructose during exercise. J. Appl. Physiol. 2004, 96: 1277-1284.
  8. Jentiens R.L.P.G, Achten J., Jeukendrup A.E.: High Oxidation Rates from Combined Carbohydrates Ingested during Exercise. Med Sci Sports Exerc, 2004; 36: 1551–1558.
  9. Jentjens R.L., Underwood K., Achten J., Currell K., Mann C.H., Jeukendrup A.E.: Exogenous Carbohydrate Oxidation Rates Are Elevated After Combined Ingestion of Glucose and Fructose During Exercise in the Heat. J Appl Physiol, 2006; 100: 807–816.
  10. Wallis G.A., Rowlands D.A., Shaw C., Jentjens R.L.P.G., Jeukendrup A.E.: Oxidation of Combined Ingestion of Maltodextrins and Fructose During Exercise. Med Sci Sports Exerc 2005, 37: 426–432.
  11. Jeukendrup A., Gleeson M.: Sport Nutrition. An Introduction to Energy Production and Performance. Second Edition. Human Kinetics, Champaign, 2010, 109,
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